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Deontay Wilder: “America Has A Badass (Named) Deontay Wilder”

March 09, 2018 - 9:12 am

It was the toughest fight of his career, but Deontay Wilder prevailed.

Wilder knocked out previously unbeaten Luis Ortiz (28-1) on Saturday to successfully defend his WBC heavyweight title for the seventh time and improve to 40-0 (39 KOs).

“America has a badass in the name of Deontay Wilder,” Wilder said on Ferrall on the Bench. “They have a great fighter that is blessed with one-punch knockout (ability), that can get any man out in any given round, whether it’s one through 12. I’m a fighter that can get you out. It’s not safe in there, no matter what. I’m just happy that people are starting to come along. America is starting to come and support and understand what’s going on. It’s a great feeling. I’m looking forward to the next one.”

 

 

That next one could be Anthony Joshua (20-0, 20 KOs), who holds the IBF, WBA and IBO titles. Joshua’s most impressive win, perhaps, came against Wladimir Klitschko at Wembley Stadium last April.

Wilder, however, believes his win over Ortiz was much more impressive.

“Everyone ducked Ortiz,” Wilder said. “No one wants to fight Ortiz because of his style and skills that he has. Ortiz would have been champion of the world, only if he had gotten the opportunity. Nobody wanted to give this man an opportunity. Even champions ducked him. He’s undefeated, never been on the canvas, never lost. This is definitely a bigger fight than (Joshua beating) Klitshco, (who’s) already been hurt, was already dethroned, coming off almost a two-year lay-off and up there in age. (Beating Ortiz) was definitely the best.”

Klitschko, 41, was coming off a loss. Ortiz, meanwhile, is no spring chicken at 38, but he had Wilder dazed in the seventh round.

“In the seventh round, he definitely caught me with something,” Wilder admitted. “But I was my biggest coach in that round. A lot of people get it confused between being hurt and being buzzed. It’s two different things. It’s two different feelings. In that round, I was only buzzed, but I was coaching myself through the whole process. I was telling myself, ‘You got this. Stay calm. Weather the storm. Smother his punches. You got this.’ I prevailed. I was able to survive. Once I went back to the corner, I was good. I’m the most dangerous man in boxing.”